YARD MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS Questionnaire

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The answers to the questions regarding YMS:

         What is the size of the market (in term of dollar value)?

The standalone Yard Management Systems (YMS) market is approximately $ 35.000,000 US which includes C3, Pinc, Navis and Yardview software solutions. The other software companies that sell YMS below, sell it in conjunction with a Warehouse Management System (WMS) and Transportation Management System (TMS) so there is no way to gauge those YMS sales as they could be with, or without, the YMS system depending on the customer’s needs. About 50% of companies still use clipboards, spreadsheets and walkie-talkies to manage their yards.

THE EFECTIVE USE OF CROSS-FUNCTIONAL TEAMS

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Software is a necessity in all facets of business today, but people are needed to manage the software, and insure data integrity for accurate data output. People are your most imprtant product. Use them to continuously improve your oragnization. Cross-Functional Teams are a good way to use multi-talented people to solve many kinds of problems and or opportunities in your organization.

THE VOICE OF THE CUSTOMER

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Always listen to the Voice of your Customer (VOC), but do it correctly:

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Common VOC Mistakes & How to Avoid Them:

First, let the Voice of the Customer (VOC) drive your company process improvements, but make sure to avoid VOC mistakes.

Voice of the Customer (VOC) is a critical component of Six Sigma, helping us establish measures that serve as a foundation for each of the DMAIC (Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve and Control) phases,   but, beware the common mistakes of VOC. Here are four (4) of them and what you can do to avoid them.

Isn’t it time to think about Cybersecurity?

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Computer security, also known as cybersecurity or IT security, is security applied to computing devices such as computers and smartphones, as well as computer networks such as private and public networks, including the whole Internet.

With all the discussion on the internet of things (IoT) and the network of sensors, robotics, RFID and software connected to the cloud, visibility, tracking, scanning and mobility to help supply chains respond to all the data and make it more usable, cybersecurity becomes a big challenge.

 Gartner projects that by 2020 there will be 26 billion “things” connected within the IoT, supply chain visibilities are endless. Cybersecurity risks lie in each of these 26 billion things. There can be breeches in any one of these links. Solutions to security issues become paramount.

The Bullwhip Affect

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The Bullwhip AffectA supply chain must get the right goods and services to their customers in the most efficient, and cost optimized, way possible. To meet this goal, each supply chain partner must function as efficiently as possible. Collaboration and extensive communication must occur in the supply chain. It must also manage, coordinate and integrate upstream and downstream in the supply chain.
Simply put: inventory swings in larger and larger “waves” in response to customer demand (the handle of the whip), with the largest “wave” of the whip hitting the supplier of raw materials.
The pulse of a lean supply chain is accuracy in demand planning. Unforeseen spikes in demand or overproduction of demand planning stimulates the supply end of the chain to respond with changes in production. Production and supply issues impact the consumer end of the supply chain and the effects ripple up and down the chain.

This is often referred to as the bullwhip effect.
(In some industries, it is known as the “whiplash” or the “whipsaw” effect.)